Friday, July 24, 2009

Harry Buzzell's Postcards: East Cemetery, South Mancester, Conn.

Address: Mr. Harry Buzzell
32 Holyoke St
Springfield,
Mass.
Postmark: South Manchester, Conn. Dec. 30, 1914

Dear Cousin,
Glad to hear from you and to know you got home safe. Sending you this tie in return for your kindness to me. Wishing you a Happy and prosperous New Year. From your loving cousin-come and see us soon again. Mabel

Harry was 21 years old in the fall of 1914 when he left his northern Maine home to work in Springfield, MA. He likely worked in a wholesale warehouse. He spent the Christmas holiday in South Manchester, Conn. with his father's brother Fred and his wife and their six daughters, including Mabel who was 2 years older than Harry.

Ivy covered Monument in East Cemetery, South Manchester, Conn.

Thursday, July 23, 2009

Vintage Thingies Thursday: Grammy Gates' Goblet

This goblet is one of a set of six that belonged to my grandparents, Alexander and Olga Gates. They were a wedding gift to them on August 25, 1929 in Maynard, Massachusetts. I don't know who gave the gift to them.
My mother was given the goblets, probably after my grandmother died in 1970. Mom kept them in the back of the cupboard high over the refrigerator and never used them. She gave them to me about 20 years ago. I do use them once in a blue moon.
Somewhere along the line, one of the goblets cracked and a triangular-shaped shard broke out from the rim.

Friday, July 17, 2009

Harry Buzzell's Postcards Part 1: Golf Club, Hartford, Conn.


The front of the postcard shows the Golf Club in Hartford, Conn. The card is addressed to Harry Buzzell, Caribou, Maine (my great-uncle) and postmarked Meriden, Conn. Aug 14, 1914. The card was sent by Eunice Buzzell Foster, younger sister of Harry's father, Colby.

"Hello Harry, How are you this summer? Do you and Earl Play baseball and did your Sunday School have there picknic on your hill this summer? We are having a nice cool time here haven't had just a few hot days. Sincerely Aunt Eunie"

Written upside down across the top:
The grounds to the right are beautiful of this building.

Earl is Harry's younger brother who would have been 13 years old at the time. Harry would have been 20 years old.
Their mother Mary was instrumental in starting the First Baptist Church in Woodland, Maine when she was a young woman. The Buzzell farm was on the top of Buzzell Hill and the current church building is built on land that was donated from the farm by Harry's older brother William many years later.

Thursday, July 16, 2009

Vintage Thingies Thursday: Grammy's Rose Pitcher

I collect pitchers. This is my first Vintage Thingies Thursday post. This pitcher belonged to my paternal grandmother, Lena Rose McNeal Buzzell (1906-1972.) It is small, just the right size for serving as a creamer.
I got the pitcher after my grandfather, Chester, died in 1989. My mother cleaned out his house and gave it to me. At the time, I lived in a 100-plus year old house and kept the rose pitcher in a chimney cupboard. When we moved fourteen years ago to a new contemporary home, the chimney cupboard came with us along with its contents packed in towels in an ash laundry basket.

Wednesday, July 15, 2009

Wordless Wednesday: Margaret Marshall, Scotland



School picture in Scotland
Margaret Marshall in circle (my mother's paternal grandmother)

Friday, July 10, 2009

Harry Buzzell's Postcards Part 1: Stone Bridge, South Manchester, Connecticut

I am inspired by other bloggers that I have been reading to photograph and share a collection of postcards from my great-uncle Harry Buzzell who grew up in Woodland in Aroostook County, Maine. He died in WWI in France and is buried there. So here is the first post of what I hope to create as a Friday series. The cards show scenes from Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts as well as holidays and birthdays. They were sent to and from various family members and friends.

Harry’s mother not only saved the 60 letters that he sent home to Colby in Woodland, Maine,
but she saved many postcards and other memorabilia from Harry’s life. The items in this series were included in the three old stationery boxes in the back of her closet.

Transcription:
Postmark: South Manchester, Conn. Dec. 13, 1914 8:30 p
Address: Mr. Harry Buzzell, #32 Holyoke St., Springfield, Mass.


Dear Harry, Do you remember this place ? We walk here Thanksgiving. Would like to see you Xmas. Hope this few lines find you well and happy. Coz. Ethel

(Ethel is Harry's first cousin, born Oct. 23, 1893 in
South Manchester, Conn., almost one month before Harry. “Ethel gave me a necktie. “ Harry Buzzell mentions Ethel in a letter home to his mother Dec. 28, 1914 saying he had been to visit at Xmas. Ethel and Harry's fathers were brothers. Ethel's father, Fred, moved to Connecticut. Harry's father, Colby, stayed in Woodland, Maine.)

Front of card:
Highland Park, The Stone Bridge by Moonlight

South Manchester, Conn.

Thursday, July 9, 2009

Harry Buzzell's World War I Story, Part 14

Time to start thinking about the 4th of July and family gatherings. Harry Buzzell, my grandfather's brother, automatically comes to mind as he is the one in our family who made the ultimate sacrifice in 1918 during World War I in France. His story was captured in his own words in 60 letters that he wrote home from 1914 to 1918.
I've written about him before some and even presented a speech once. But now I want to look at it again and thought that I would create a series about him in honor of the July 4th holiday weekend.

The photograph shows his burial site in France. Harry was killed at age 24 on October 20, 1918. The armistice ending the war came just 22 days later. He was buried in France. His last letter was written October 18, two days before his death. The last letter was not even postmarked until October 23 and certainly would have arrived in his mother’s mail much later.

Excerpts From Harry’s Letters
(Here I have changed the grammar and spelling.)

Last letter, written October 18, 1918, France, to Mother



Just a few lines to let you know I am well as ever and am thinking of you very often. I am glad to hear you are all well and the crops are as good as could be expected.
Has Arthur gone to camp yet and what do you hear from Clyde? The war news looks pretty good. But you can never tell but we are all hoping it will be all over soon.
I received your letter of Sept 17 and I get the papers right along. You mustn’t think I am sick if you don’t hear from me as often as you think you ought to for it is hard to get a base censor and envelopes. A feller can’t ask the Officers to censor a letter when they are so busy.
I am driving just two horses and ride one of them in a saddle. Of course, I guess the boys would think of that as a funny way to drive.
My side is fine now. I guess it is all well again.
It has been quite muddy but not so awful bad for the time of year.
Yes, some of the boys have colds, but I don’t think there is any grip.
It is a fine habit you have of sending writing material as it is hard to get when you can use it and it is something I must have.
I am glad to hear Myra is well and I would like to see my little nephew. I would like to write to them, but it is all I can do to let you know I am well. The first time you see Myra tell her I will fight harder for the new nephew. I suppose it will be hard to find a name good enough for him.
Hoping this finds you all well and happy with much love from your Soldier boy.
Harry I Buzzell




to be continued



Wednesday, July 8, 2009

Harry Buzzell's World War I Story, Part 13

Time to start thinking about the 4th of July and family gatherings. Harry Buzzell, my grandfather's brother, automatically comes to mind as he is the one in our family who made the ultimate sacrifice in 1918 during World War I in France. His story was captured in his own words in 60 letters that he wrote home from 1914 to 1918.
I've written about him before some and even presented a speech once. But now I want to look at it again and thought that I would create a series about him in honor of the July 4th holiday weekend.

Excerpts From Harry’s Letters
(Here I have changed the grammar and spelling.)

About philosophy and fear, written April 7, 1918, Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Georgia, to Mother and Home Folks
Well, I am wondering what you folks think. It is a time to be anxious and more or less excited. Boys are wondering where we are to move and how soon, if they will get a chance to go home before we go, and if we, or they, will
ever come back at all. Some look at it one way and some another. There are so many stories going around. It helps to confuse us. The officers don’t tell us any too much. If they know or not, I can’t say.
Well, it is enough to make a feller stop and study to think. You may not get a chance to come home and don’t know what danger you are taking which is great, you must admit. I don’t see how some of them stand it at all. . . I know I couldn’t stand it if I didn’t have anything but this earthly life to cling to, but as you know, I have something bigger to live and fight and die for if necessary, than this present life and may I not hesitate to do His will.
Not that I do not value my life or that I do not love my folks and all the people at large, for I do. Although I never was much of a boy to show my love, but I do not think the folks understood me in many ways. But now I am willing to fight, suffer, and die for you and them, that the world may be free and have peace that can’t be had till this war is won in the right way, which I pray may come soon. All I am sorry for is that I ain’t a stronger and better man for Him.
Photo shows memorial stone for Harry in Caribou, Maine. He is buried in France.

to be continued



Tuesday, July 7, 2009

Harry Buzzell's World War I Story, Part 12

Time to start thinking about the 4th of July and family gatherings. Harry Buzzell, my grandfather's brother, automatically comes to mind as he is the one in our family who made the ultimate sacrifice in 1918 during World War I in France. His story was captured in his own words in 60 letters that he wrote home from 1914 to 1918.
I've written about him before some and even presented a speech once. But now I want to look at it again and thought that I would create a series about him in honor of the July 4th holiday weekend.

Excerpts From Harry’s Letters
(Here I have changed the grammar and spelling. Pictured is Harry's younger brother, Arthur, in his World War I uniform. Three of the Buzzell sons served in the war. Two survived.)

About patriotism, written December 9, 1917, Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Georgia, to Mother and to brother Arthur Buzzell
I am not afraid to give my life for thi
s cause and will do my best for my country.
Let me tell you something. You may be patriotic and support the Country and like to be a soldier, but the men that are out of the draft age are the fortunate ones, believe me.

There are a lot of lonesome days and a lot of hardships to be endured before our training is complete. It may be a long time before we get in any actual service, but there is no place like home. A fellow can’t get a furlow. I understand there will be no furlows for Christmas in this Battery. Don’t be misled by patriotic speakers, but stay where you are as long as you can and enjoy the love of home and company.

to be continued



Monday, July 6, 2009

Harry Buzzell's World War I Story, Part 11

Time to start thinking about the 4th of July and family gatherings. Harry Buzzell, my grandfather's brother, automatically comes to mind as he is the one in our family who made the ultimate sacrifice in 1918 during World War I in France. His story was captured in his own words in 60 letters that he wrote home from 1914 to 1918.
I've written about him before some and even presented a speech once. But now I want to look at it again and thought that I would create a series about him in honor of the July 4th holiday weekend.

Excerpts From Harry’s Letters
(Here I have changed the grammar and spelling.)

About motor battery, written November 20, 1917, (Harry’s 24th birthday), Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Georgia, to Mother
There is some talk again of them making this battery a motor battery. If they do, the men in the driving will be used on the trucks. That will be better than horses for there will be no horses to care for.

[The photo shows Ralph, Harry's big brother, with the horses back home on the farm in Woodland, Maine.]

to be continued



Sunday, July 5, 2009

Harry Buzzell's World War I Story, Part 10


Time to start thinking about the 4th of July and family gatherings. Harry Buzzell, my grandfather's brother, automatically comes to mind as he is the one in our family who made the ultimate sacrifice in 1918 during World War I in France. His story was captured in his own words in 60 letters that he wrote home from 1914 to 1918.
I've written about him before some and even presented a speech once. But now I want to look at it again and thought that I would create a series about him in honor of the July 4th holiday weekend.

Excerpts From Harry’s Letters
(Here I have changed the grammar and spelling. Pictured today is Harry's brother, Clyde, in his World War I uniform. Clyde entered the service first and returned to the Woodland home farm after the war. Harry was killed and buried in France in 1918.)

About army hiking, written November 4, 1917, Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Georgia, to Mother
Some fellers fall out most every hike. Then they are picked up in the ambulance and hauled along. It’s quite a test, but I haven’t had to fall out yet. They make them walk as long as they can. If they think they are only spleeny, two officers walk beside them and make them walk.

to be continued



Saturday, July 4, 2009

Harry Buzzell's World War I Story, Part 9

Time to start celebrating the 4th of July. We always have a family gathering at the lake. Harry Buzzell, my grandfather's brother, automatically comes to mind as he is the one in our family who made the ultimate sacrifice in 1918 during World War I in France. His story was captured in his own words in 60 letters that he wrote home from 1914 to 1918.
I've written about him before some and even presented a speech once. But now I want to look at it again and thought that I would create a series about him in honor of the July 4th holiday weekend.

Excerpts From Harry’s Letters
(Here I have changed the grammar and spelling.)

About auto School, written January 2, 1917, Hartford, Connecticut, to Mother
I thought I could go to work in the factory and to school two nights a week, but as I got through in the factory, I am giving all my time to the school. I guess it will be better this way. I can get rested and go to school. It is called the Hartford Auto School. I like it so far. It is going to cost me quite a bit, but I think it is what I want, repair and driving cars combined. The repair is practical work on cars so when I get through I can either drive or repair. I find the best jobs and best pay is driving and a fellow isn’t much good if he can't drive if necessary.

to be continued



Friday, July 3, 2009

Harry Buzzell's World War I Story, Part 8


Time to start thinking about and getting ready for the 4th of July. Harry Buzzell, my grandfather's brother, automatically comes to mind as he is the one in our family who made the ultimate sacrifice in 1918 during World War I in France. His story was captured in his own words in 60 letters that he wrote home from 1914 to 1918.
I've written about him before some and even presented a speech once. But now I want to look at it again and thought that I would create a series about him in anticipation of the upcoming holiday weekend.

Excerpts From Harry’s Letters
(Here I have changed the grammar and spelling. Today's photo is Harry's sister, Myra who had some eye problems that he asks about in his letter.)

About dreaming about home, written February 13, 1916, Pinecastle, Florida, to Mother
I dreamed I was home last night and I thought it was spring. We were putting in the crops and it seemed as if Papa had sold all the horses and bought mules and we were having some time. How is Myra this winter? Does the school work seem hard for her? Do the kids go on the car this winter or do they board?
[The car was the Aroostook Valley Railroad, an electric trolley that provided transportation from Colby to Caribou.]

to be continued



Thursday, July 2, 2009

Harry Buzzell's World War I Story, Part 7


Time to start thinking about and getting ready for the 4th of July. Harry Buzzell, my grandfather's brother, automatically comes to mind as he is the one in our family who made the ultimate sacrifice in 1918 during World War I in France. His story was captured in his own words in 60 letters that he wrote home from 1914 to 1918.
I've written about him before some and even presented a speech once. But now I want to look at it again and thought that I would create a series about him in anticipation of the upcoming holiday weekend.

Excerpts From Harry’s Letters
(Here I have changed the grammar and spelling. The photo today is Harry's older sister, Fannie, who was already married when this letter was written.)

About eclipse of the sun and referral to sister Fannie Buzzell, written February 6, 1916, Orlando, Florida, to Mother
How are the pigs and all the stock? Have the boys had the colts hitched up yet?
Did you see the eclipse of the sun last week? The women did but Mr. Philbrick and I were so busy we didn’t have time.
Do the boys get their dinners up to Fannies this winter?
Aunt Hatty is lost without an almanac. Have you any kicking around?

to be continued



Wordless Wednesday: Colby Orin Buzzell, Woodland, Maine

Wednesday, July 1, 2009

Harry Buzzell's World War I Story, Part 6


Time to start thinking about and getting ready for the 4th of July. Harry Buzzell, my grandfather's brother, automatically comes to mind as he is the one in our family who made the ultimate sacrifice in 1918 during World War I in France. His story was captured in his own words in 60 letters that he wrote home from 1914 to 1918.
I've written about him before some and even presented a speech once. But now I want to look at it again and thought that I would create a series about him in anticipation of the upcoming holiday weekend.

Excerpts From Harry’s Letters
(Here I have changed the grammar and spelling. The photo today is Harry's sister, Sadie.)

About lawn party at home in Colby, written January 23, 1915, Orlando, Florida, to sister Sadie Buzzell
I helped a man put on fertilizer and ashes in grove last week. He harrowed it till it was like a garden. He only had about 8 acres and he keeps that looking great. It is raining as hard as it can pour, warm as you please, just comes down as easy as it does when we want to have a social up in Maine, especially a lawn party.


to be continued